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The Impressions We Make

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Since facebook has started bringing back memories of what we posted 3, 4, even 5 years ago, I am sure that I’m not the only one who has been tickled to see something we posted but had already forgotten. A few years ago I met my friend Rosie. I was gifting my mixed media paintings to the local area Starbucks Coffee shops, like these prints on canvas now availalbe in my Etsy shop:

Rosie saw one in our neighborhood Starbucks, asked about it and they handed her my business card. Rosie called me and asked if I would be willing to show her how to create her own mixed media art.  I was so excited to meet her and create with her. She made this gorgeous, colorful collaged Christmas tree. It came back to me on facebook as a memory from 2012.

My friend Rosie’s first mixed media collage – not quite dry yet so some areas of glue still appear white

A friend sent me a photo of the mini album I created for her when Margo was surprised by her now husband’s proposal. Remember this? she asked in the text. I laughed! Yes, I remember creating it, but more importantly, I was so warmed to know she still had it around and would share the pic with me.

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Margo’s Marriage Proposal Captured in a Heart-Shaped Mini Album

Another canvas I created came back to me recently in a totally unexpected way. I participate in an annual breast cancer fundraiser. At this year’s Think Pink Crafting Extravaganza, formerly known as Survivor Crop, and my 12th of 15 years participating in this wonderful event, breast cancer survivor Kendra spoke to us about her experiences; her journey with chemo and then radiation treatments was harrowing.

She spoke of how difficult it is for people to talk to someone when they are sick. People look away, pretend they don’t see you, fail to acknowledge your existence, mostly because they don’t know what to say or how to act around cancer patients. Friends fail to call, you’re sick, in pain, scared, and lonely, so lonely. Other people come into your life, like the wife of one of her husband’s co-workers. Sandy listened to Kendra and was a resourceful and caring sounding board. Sandy is one of the Think Pink Crafting Extravaganza organizers.

After talking to us as a group, Kendra visited with many of us as we crafted all day in our fundraising efforts. When she made her way to our table, she stopped to sit down by me. I had just finished a mixed media canvas using Simple Stories new Hope Collection of patterned papers and matching stickers. I call it Breezy:

Kendra talked about my Breezy painting and how it reminded her of the collage she has been gifted with.She told me how she had it hanging in her bedroom and when she was too sick to get out of bed she would look at it. She said it was fascinating because each time she looked at it she would find something new; there were layers and layers of messages and images in the painting. She said she loved it and how much it had helped her.

I asked Kendra who the artist was, but she didn’t recall. I asked her what the collage was of and she told me it was 3 women; it was breast cancer survivor art. You know how they say you can just sense where something is heading, the goosebumps appear on your arms and it becomes really quiet all around you as you focus in on just one person or one thing? Well, that’s what happened to me. I then asked where she’d gotten the painting and she told me that Sandy had given it to her.

For several years, I would make mixed media collages for the Silent Auctions at this breast cancer fundraiser. I recall creating one with 3 women on it and wondered if Sandy had bid on it and won it at one of the auctions? It was so rewarding to know that a collage I had created and donated to a previous year’s silent auction had been bid on and won by my friend, Sandy, and then out of the thoughtfulness of her heart, Sandy had gifted it to the lovely breast cancer survivor sitting next to me,telling me her story, Kendra.

I told Kendra that I thought I might be the artist and asked her if she would send me a photo of the canvas, and I’d also love a photo of her with the painting and she agreed.  I was close to tears, but it really didn’t hit me until the drive home that night. We raised almost $20,000 that day and the tears poured down my face driving home. It means the world to me to know that my art can have this kind of an impact on a total stranger.

My hope has always been that my colorful, whimsical and, sometimes. quirky view of the world through my art will touch emotions in others. Unbeknownst to be, I certainly had. I couldn’t be more proud, so I’m off to paint more! Happy Thanksgiving 2016 everyone!

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Kendra and the 3 Girls Survivor Collage

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Halloween Just Might Come in a Tin

As many of you know, I love to recycle or upcycle stuff. I had been collecting empty Altoid mint tins for a mixed media canvas class I intended to teach at a local scrapbook store, but unfortunately the store, like so many other small independently owned shops, has closed. We are down to only one or two scrapbooking stores in San Diego county and it’s disheartening. If you aren’t already familiar with the 3/50 Project, Saving the Brick and Mortars our Nation is Built On, please visit their site here.

So last weekend while participating in a pet rescue fundraiser, I created 15 miniature Halloween-themed tins from ribbon, stickers and beads I had sitting around my studio with my stash of creative goodies. What can they be used for? Spare keys, spare change, business cards, or even that emergency chocolate supply you want to keep handy, just in case.

 

Want to make some yourself?

Here’s how: Starting with a clean mint tin, I printed vintage witch photographs on full sheet label paper, trimmed them down to size and adhered them to the top of each tin.

Next, I realized that the tin had the mandatory nutritional information on the bottom, so I added photos there, too, to cover it up!

Using a hot glue gun, I adhered ribbon to the top outer rim of the tin creating a skirt for each tin. I have one with this crinkly old ivory ribbon that reminds me of the inside lining of a coffin.. how appropriate for Halloween, right?

I added stickers and jewels, flowers and glitter glue dots, rhinestones and mica flakes using liquid glue and pop dots for a raised or 3D effect.

Lastly, I added “feet” so that each tin would stand elevated off of a surface. I used matching beads, ensuring that the ones I chose had a least one flat side to keep them level. Using my hot glue again, I glued 4 beads onto the corners of the bottom of each tin. In the photo, the first tin on the left in the second row was photographed upside down so that you can see the amber bead feet.

Remember to keep a cup of ice water handy when using your hot glue gun because it’s inevitable that you’ll forget and touch a spot of hot glue so quickly plunge the burning finger into the ice water to harden the glue and stop the burn… just think of it as a little witches brew you have on the side!

One other thing… I found my Halloween costume at WalMart in the women’s PJ department. It is so soft, comfy and was only $6! It’s a black night shirt with this on the front. The only thing that would make it more perfect was if it glowed in the dark!

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Happy Halloween!


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The Never-ending Challenge of Family, Part 1

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As it is Memorial Day, and we stop to thank our veterans and those who have selflessly served us and given for us, I can’t help thinking of my younger brother who passed away about a month ago.

This post will be a bit off from my usual subjects of art or food, but don’t let that stop you from reading! I think many of us will admit to having grown up in a dysfunctional family. I know I will! I still remember my Abnormal Psychology class where the first discussion was to try to define normal. Okay, so we learned there is no “normal” and applying that to my childhood there wasn’t much “functional” in our family life.

My younger brother was diagnosed with juvenile-onset (Type I) diabetes when he was 10. I remember that it was at the holidays because they let him come home for Christmas morning with the promise that he not eat anything while there. Well the story goes that, during his hospital stay, the doctor and our mom were talking outside my brother’s hospital room and my brother overheard their conversation. The doctor supposedly told mom that my brother would most likely not live past 30; now remember, this was the early 70’s. The story my brother tells is that he decided to enjoy his life while he was here and he used this to substantiate not taking care of himself, not eating right (he would drink a Big Gulp of Pepsi – no, not diet – most mornings), not exercising, drinking and doing drugs… a cautionary tale, for certain, when one has access to syringes for insulin use, they can also easily double for drug use.

This past decade showed the results of his lack of care, and lack of accountability for his health and his situation. He was on dialysis, then he was blessed with a kidney transplant, then if his MediCal had been in effect he could have had a double transplant and received a new pancreas (wow! what a difference that would’ve made).  Then he had one leg amputated below the knee and about 6 months later the other leg, too. He was wheelchair bound and unwilling to help himself in any recognizable way. Due to neuropathy, his hands became useless curled-in claws; he was for awhile able to use a spoon to feed himself, but mostly needed round-the-clock care.

Throughout this time, he was to put it as politely as possible: a curmudgeon. No one, and I mean, no one wanted to be around him. He was a victim and he made sure everyone was as miserable as he was. In many respects, he because the junior version of our father. He was also in a lot of pain as he had wounds that were not healing and spent the majority of these past couple of years in the hospital. The care facility had, with this last trip to the hospital, informed us that he was no longer welcome there and could not return.

Growing up, I found myself being a die-hard optimist. Whenever I would get into a pity party, I would think about how lucky I was; I wasn’t, for example, in a wheelchair, blind, deaf or suffering from any other inability to care for myself and others. There were times I wanted to shake my brother and yell at him Cher’s famous movie line, “Snap out of it!” I still recall the Christmas Eve dinner out at a local Chinese buffet with mom and my brother when I repeated the infamous Dr. Phil line to him, “And how’s that working for you?” Surprisingly, that stopped his whining in it’s tracks (at least for the remainder of the meal)…. on an aside, he later starting attending NA, which help him build friendships and gave his life some purpose.

He was the type of person who had always been bailed out by someone and never took responsibility for his own life or actions. I had loaned him money, given him advice, and even gotten a lawyer acquaintance to take on a case to defend him when I later learned he was guilty and had lied to me! My parents, too, had gotten him out of every conceivable situation he could get himself into, giving him money or letting him move back in with them for the last several years.

And he was cantankerous, obnoxious, and had reverted back to a child in many ways; throwing temper trantrums from his wheelchair like he was a 4-year-old. In the end, he managed to push everyone away from him. My sister, who lives in Omaha, was the one to tell me he was back in the hospital and not doing well. I was his only living relative in the San Diego area. So, guilt, I guess, made me and my son drive to the hospital to see him the night they decided to take him off life support.

I’d spoken to the nurse caring for him and she knew we were on our way. His heart was not going to keep him going much longer and they were discussing a move to hospice. It was a Sunday night and hospital visiting hours were ending at 8:00 p.m. however she said we could come and stay as long as we wanted. When we arrived one of the nurses asked when I had last seen my brother. This took me back and with a lump in my throat I said that it had been about 2 years. The breathing apparatus was horrible, keeping his jaw propped wide open so that he could breathe. I know that he recognized my voice, although I still wonder if the fact that as I age I sound more like our mother and maybe he mistook me for her. I know that he recognized my son’s crazy afro curls. But, he could not speak.

He could express pain, which he was in a lot of with wounds on his leg stumps which weren’t healing. He was being given morphine, which we knew gave him hallucinations, making him think people were going to throw him out of where he was living or that he was being kept against his will, etc. But at this point, I don’t know how much he knew about what was going on with him. We talked to him and went with him as they changed floors for the continuous care making him as comfortable as possible.

Seeing my brother this way broke my heart. It’s hard to be angry with someone you love when they are this helpless. Also, the fact that he could not talk back, made him easier to be around (wry smile here while wiping tears off my face). I had so many emotions coursing through me all I did on the drive home was cry. I took the next day off and stayed in bed grieving. Tuesday night after work I wanted to see him again. They had decided he would not make the transition to hospice and were keeping him in the hospital.

I kept thinking I would not want to die alone and knew that none of his friends had gone to see him. I have to admit the shock when seeing him. He was wearing a green hospital gown that I can only describe as “fresh” green. It wasn’t a pale, washed-out hospital gown but a cheery color against the stark white sheets and pillowcase. He was asleep, unconscious, unresponsive, and heavily medicated. As I sat on the hospital bed with him, his breathing would stop for what seemed like long periods of time and my eyes would widen wondering if he was gone, but then he’d gasp and start breathing again.

He did not respond to my voice, as far as I could recognize, or my touch. I started to tell him stories of our childhood growing up in Prairie Lane, an Omaha neighborhood. Remember when we used to play Red Rover using the sidewalk in the middle of the front lawn as the dividing line in any yard game? Remember, back before childproof lids, we would mix baking soda and vinegar in empty pill bottles, put them in the middle of the street and then run like mad to get away before they exploded everywhere? Remember when you took my bike and wrecked it, losing your 2 front teeth? Remember when you shot a bottle rocket off from a soda bottle you held in your outstretched hand and it boomeranged back at you, burning you in the stomach? Remember the animals we had, what a menagerie! Remember when I realized what was actually in that foil-wrapped package in the freezer labelled “Snake Food”… well, you said, what did I think you were doing with the mice? Ewwww.

By this time, tears were streaming down my face and I no longer tried to stop them, just let them fall. My brother seemed so child-like laying in the hospital bed and peaceful. All my anger and resentment towards him evaporated; forgiven.

I don’t know whether it was for him or for me, but I sang lullabies to him, the ones mom used to sing to us at bedtime, starting with his favorite: Puff the Magic Dragon. Then, I Gave My Love a Cherry, 14 Angels Guard My Sleep, All the Pretty Little Ponies, and yes, Twinkle Twinkle. I have no idea if he heard, sensed, or even knew I was there, but that was the last time I saw my younger brother alive. His heart stopped the next morning. The hospital never called me as the written directions they had were to let mom know. My sister then sent me a text.

Rest in peace, little bro.


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Handmade is Heartfelt – Part 1, A Good Meal

My son made rouladen (German beef roll-ups) a couple of weeks ago for dinner as part of his Health Class assignment to cook something from a different culture than our own. Previously, we had the opportunity of going out to eat at a restaurant which served food from a different country that we had not yet tried. This was surprisingly a small number of countries as we love to try new tastes and traditions. Our options included: Epthiopian, African, Russian and Argentinan. We went with the Russian and had an amazing meal at Pomegranate in San Diego, CA. The salad sampler gave us the opportunity to try a variety of salads and the lamb in the Chakapuli was so flavorful that I can’t wait to go again! It is a quaint restaurant on El Cajon Blvd and people have written poetry or other inspirational thoughts on the walls with markers. It’s entertaining to read them as you wait for your meal.

Rouladen

Rouladen
Or as we called it as kids “Pickle in the Middle”

Back to tonight’s dinner, we took photos of each step while creating (and obviously, eating) my grandmother’s rouladen dish. Depending upon which area of Germany your family is from, you may put pickles in the middle of the beef roll-up or carrots. Zac’s grandmother on my father’s side, Ernestine Rech Brendel Bange, was the second of eight Rech children living on Bingen am Rhein; we use pickles. However, I think that what may be unique to Oma’s recipe in that we use sweet pickles while most others use dill pickles. As one of the eldest daughters in the family, Erna learned to cook and cook she did. However, my great aunt, Irmgard, the youngest of eight children, did not. Years after my grandmother passed away, I made Sauerbraten for Irma. It brought tears to her eyes and she weepily said it tasted just like her mother’s.  Of course it was, I explained that the receipe was handed down to Oma, then to my mom to cook for our father, and then to me when I was upgraded from salad chef to full dinner cook at the age of 14 as my mother had returned to work full-time.

JeffSmith

Jeff Smith, PBS’s Television Cooking Show and Cookbook Author of numerous Frugal Gourmet Cookbooks including The Frugal Gourmet, The Frugal Gourmet Cooks with Wine, The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian, The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Three Ancient Cuisines: China – Greece – Rome, The Frugal Gourmet Cooks American, and the Whole Family Cookbook

I loved to cook and the variety of dishes my mother had in her recipe file box. I distinctly recall watching what I believe to be the predecessor of The Food Network… cooking shows on PBS. In particular, I rarely missed an episode of The Frugal Gourmet with Jeff Smith. He urged us to get with our grandparents, aunts and uncles and cook – write down their recipes, because when they are gone, their recipes may be lost, so preserve them today. He had so many little tips and tricks that I remember to this day. For example, “hot pan, cold oil, food won’t stick” or soaking anchovies in milk to reduce the salt. Cooking, and I include shortcuts which include using a prepared mix or jarred item in this category, is a distinct handmade activity, a gift for others that comes from the heart.

Back to my son’s assignment… Rouladen uses the liquid from the pickle jar and water in the sauce that cooks the beef. We needed more liquid than anticipated, as I often save the liquid from previous jars for just this purpose, so we had leftover sweet pickles (gherkins). I coarsely chopped these and the remaining 1/2 onion, put them in the food processor and decided to make pickle relish. Browsing the Internet for a recipe, I found only a few variations that start from an already pickled cucumber, so I created my own recipe. Here it is:

  • Sweet pickles (gherkins), chopped fine… about 8-10 made about 1 1/2 – 2 cups chopped pickle
  • Onions, chopped fine… about 1/2 a large onion
  • Fire roasted red pepper, chopped fine… one large jarred pepper, drained and chopped
  • Stone ground mustard, about 2 teaspoons
  • Celery salt, pepper, and turmeric… not as much as if you were going to pickle a cucumber so start with 1/2 teaspoon each and taste, adjusting as seasoning requires
  • Apple cider vinegar, about 2 Tablespoons, and agave syrup, about 1 Tablespoon
  • Water… not to cover but to cover at least two-thirds of the ingredients in the saucepan, probably about 1/2 – 3/4 cup

Place ingredients in a medium-sized saucepan; bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Let cool and then store in a jar in the refrigerator. Bring on the hot dogs, deviled eggs, mega sandwiches, etc.

It being the holiday season, my hope is that you share a handmade meal or food gift with others and be very thankful to those who do the same with you in return.  Look for my next part of Handmade is Heartfelt, when I talk about gifts we make for others.

Here are the step by step photos of Zac’s meal with the recipe to follow:

Rouladen Recipe

Thinly sliced round steak, rump roast, breakfast steak, or meat for carne asada, sliced large enough to roll

sliced bacon             onion slices              salt      pepper         sweet pickles and juice       oil    toothpicks

Lay breakfast steaks on flat surface and salt and pepper. Form rouladen by placing a slice of bacon on top of each steak, trimming if too long. Place a couple of onion slices on top of each bacon piece. Place one sweet pickle on top of the onion and roll everything up. Secure with toothpicks. Brown in oil on all sides. Remove from pan and drain oil. Return to pan and cover with half of the pickle juice and additional water to cover. Bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook 45-60 minutes depending on thickness of steaks, adding more juice if necessary.

Recipe from Erna Bange


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With Gratitude

I’ve done training in the corporate world for years… harassment prevention, drug-free workplace, violence prevention, supervision training, conflict resolution, et.al. and I love it! I’ve taught Human Resources at SDSU College of Extended Studies Certification program, specifically Performance Management courses. But, when it comes to my creative work, I’ve invited co-workers to meet a couple of times and taught them what I’ve learned about creating mixed media canvases. Any donations they made towards supplies were added to my Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation fundraising efforts. As previously mentioned, I started dabbling with paint and texture about 2 years ago when I took my first ever online art workshop with Christy Tomlinson from ScarletLime.com.

Most recently, I have officially been unemployed from my “day job” for 4 weeks now and I am surprised at how busy I have been… looking for a job truly is a full-time job. The last time I was unemployed was in 1999 and that change motivated me to leave Louisiana and return to San Diego, which turned out to be the best decision for my career and for my son. Within a few weeks, I found an amazing job in my field working as H.R. Director for a small-sized electronics manufacturing company, I bought a home locally, and sold my home in Shreveport. I always felt the change was meant to be. So, with this current situation I keep reminding myself that I will look back on this one day and say it was the best thing that ever happened to me.

Meanwhile, I have a bit more time to focus on my art. Yesterday I taught my first “paid” gig centering around my canvas art. I have started a series of girl art canvas board classes that I teach at EverAfter Scrapbooks in Vista, CA.  These girls were inspired by my love of J. Ruth Gendler’s “The Book of Qualities” and the courage it took Ruth to get the book to it’s original printing by creating Turquoise Mountain Publications when other companies were not interested in publishing her work. Ruth lived in Omaha, Nebraska, where I grew up, and now lives and teaches art in Berkeley, CA. Read her Artist’s Statement to be inspired, too!

The Book of Qualities by J. Ruth Gendler

The Book of Qualities by J. Ruth Gendler presents over 70 qualities — including Pleasure, Anger, Terror, Beauty, and Change — as everyday characters who live among us. Both personal and impersonal, the Qualities convey a variety of human emotions in a simple and entertaining manner; readers are inspired to reflect on their own qualities and communicate their feelings with new clarity.

The Book of Qualities Original Cover, Turquoise Mountain Publications printing 1984

The Book of Qualities Original Cover, Turquoise Mountain Publications printing 1984

I, for one, am grateful that Ruth Gendler persevered to get the book’s original printing published. This book has been a favorite gift of mine for friends and I read a portion of “Joy” from the book at my son’s dedication, 22 years ago! The book has been set to life on stage and I remember years ago purchasing a calendar with 12 months of Qualities, which I thoroughly enjoyed. I found two additional books by Ruth and have ordered them at my local bookstore. I also learned that the Book of Qualities has been translated into German: Das Buch der Lebensgeister: 76 Qualitäten, die in uns wirken – sehr gut!

I do so love the underdog-type story that turns out even better in the end. Along similar lines, Mannheim Steamroller had difficulty getting a recording company to promote their music, thus creating American Gramophone and the rest of their story, including their Fresh Aire series, one of my favorites Classical Gas by Mason Williams, and amazing holiday music we all love to hear, is more Omaha history! Their website talks of new Christmas music.

Back to yesterday’s class, I thoroughly enjoyed working with my class participants and the new store owners, Sandy and Kyle Christie. Some of these people I know from our fundraising efforts at Survivor Crop and a couple were new acquaintances; all of whom were a delight to have in class. I was so enchanted with how everyone encouraged and complimented each others’ efforts… it was quite empowering! We took photos, of course, and delighted at how unique each completed canvas turned out.

I was tickled that we ended right on time, everyone completing their projects. I was also thrilled that many of the class members signed up for December’s Joy Girl canvas. The class will be at EverAfter Scrapbooks on Sunday December 8, 2013, from Noon to 4 p.m. Call the store to register… I would love to see you there! Here’s Joy Girl:

December Joy Girl Canvas Board Class

December Joy Girl Canvas Board Sample
Quote reads: “Joy is a girl who loves the scent of cinnamon and evergreen”


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Thinking About My Holiday Shopping List

It is amazing to my how many people I mention my etsy shop to, who have no idea what etsy is! So, for all of us hard-working, mostly handmade gift artists and craftspeople, here’s a quick plug:

The Holidays are quickly approaching. Before you spend precious time and gas running from store to store and fighting the crowds only to find the same selection of gift ideas everywhere you go why not spend at least a few moments visiting www.etsy.com

Etsy is an online marketplace made up of over 850,000 independently owned and operated shops that create and sell their own handmade jewelry, clothing, housewares and personal care items as well as unusual Vintage and Antique items.

By shopping with one of these independently owned artist shops from the comfort of your home you will not only find unique gift ideas but you will be helping a small business person this season.

What could be easier. Unless you take a few moments to look you will never know if the perfect gifts for the special people in your life could be found without ever leaving the house.

Here’s the link to my shop, Carla’s Craft: https://www.etsy.com/shop/CarlasCraft

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From all of us to all of you: Happy Holiday Shopping! 🙂


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I’d Love to Wear Costumes for a Living

Since Halloween is just around the corner and costume warehouses have popped up again just for the season to get us all in the Spirit, I’ve been thinking about whether it’s just easier to dust off and re-purpose an old costume. I love to dress up. I danced ballet, tap, toe and jazz for years growing up and loved the costumes we got to wear at each year-end recital… i also loved being raised up from below the stage in front of the row of floor lights with 20+ other girls, arms entwined behind each others’ backs, one knee bent, ready to high kick our way into the finale! Give me a top hat and some tap shoes and I’m in heaven!

But I love the costumes. Sequins, fishnet tights, tulle, tutus, tails, whatever it was I loved it. Over the years, I remember Cindy and I were chickens once, Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum, belly dancers, French jazz dancers, oh so many costumes… and mom spray painting our shoes to match! I still think back to how my friends sat through two acts of a very long (often boring) recital and wonder why they did it… maybe it was the pineapple parfaits at DQ afterwards? 🙂

But, I digress, my topic here is that I’d love to wear costumes for a living… within some parameters, that is.

For example, I would not want to be a costumed hot dog walking the streets handing our coupons for Harvey’s or some such. I imagine the costume is hot and uncomfortable and people forget that you are human, just trying to do your job… I doubt anyone leads you around by hand as they do with Chuck E at Chuck E Cheese.

And some uniforms really rank right up there with  have the standard red and yellow colors in their theme, which supposedly encourages hunger thoughts. I also would hate to be a mascot or Santa – there’s something pervy about those jobs that I’d have them included in the Dirty Jobs TV show for another reason altogether!

No, I think I’d love to be an actor (or play one on TV). Or work in a costume store and get to wear a new costume everyday! Or better still, work in costumes for a live stage show, like in Vegas. Now, that would be cool, although I imagine they are sewing and repairing as much as creating, but what fun would it be to make costumes for a show?

But back to being an actor, or better yet a comedian from the old variety shows. Like Laugh In, the Carol Burnett Show, or my favorite: I Love Lucy. Wouldn’t you love to be so funny that you had your own show, people laughed at everything you did or said, and you got to wear a new costume each week? Well, that was Lucy and Ethel, and Ricky and Fred for that matter, but mostly the ladies.

Here’s Lucy in some memorable costumes:

Not only was she funny, Lucy was beautiful… I often think she tried to hide her beauty behind the jokes… and she was pragmatic and smart. Read some of her wise words:

  • “I’d rather regret the things I’ve done than the things I haven’t done.”
  • “I’m not funny. What I am is brave.”
  • “Love yourself first and everything else falls into line. You really have to love yourself first to get anything done in this life.”
  • “It’s a helluva start, being able to recognize what makes you happy.”

And here are some of her wise cracks:

  • “If you want to find trouble, find yourself a redhead.”
  • “Once in his life, every man is entitled to fall madly in love with a gorgeous redhead.”

I Love Lucy, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, My Three Sons … oh, those were the days! These days we have vampires and reality TV… hmm…. ’nuff said here, too.